Table of Contents

Introduction

  • The Director of Graduate Studies
  • Advising and Registration
  • Statement of Shared Values
  • The Honor Code
  • Research Fellowships and Grants

The M.A. Degree: An Overview

  • The M.A. Language Requirement
  • The Theory-Proficiency Examination
  • The M.A./Ph.D. Written Examination
  • The M.A. Thesis

The Ph.D. Degree: An Overview

  • The Ph.D. Language Requirement
  • The First Ph.D. Oral Examination (Dissertation Proposal Defense)
  • Advancement to Candidacy
  • The Dissertation
  • The Second Ph.D. Oral Examination (Dissertation Defense)

Appendix I: Financial Aid

Appendix II: Summary of Requirements and Deadlines

Appendix III: Graduation Policy

Appendix IV: Policy for Conferring the Glen Haydon Award for an Outstanding Dissertation in Musicology

Introduction

This document outlines the departmental requirements of our M.A. and Ph.D. programs in Musicology; it also explain what students should and must do at various points in these programs in order to make satisfactory progress and to remain in “good standing” (both of which are normally required for purposes of continuing registration and funding). “Good standing” is an official University term governing academic eligibility to pursue, or continue in, a program according to various criteria; “satisfactory progress” is a matter of departmental judgment taking into account good standing and other issues such as a student’s overall performance within an appropriate scheme of study.

Our graduate program is an integrated M.A.-Ph.D. program, constructed on the assumption that students will pursue the M.A. and Ph.D. in one continuous sequence: the M.A. is one of the required steps in earning the Ph.D. Students accepted into the program who have already earned a graduate degree from a different institution will consult with the Director of Graduate Studies to determine whether or not that degree will be recognized in whole or in part, based on the requirements of that degree and their congruence with those of our own program, including but not limited to such factors as the nature of the coursework (seminar-based, as opposed to lectures or surveys), the number of credit hours, the requirement of a substantial master’s thesis, and the presence within the institution of a comparable Ph.D. program. A student who has met all these requirements may petition the Director of Graduate Studies to waive the requirement of completing our M.A. degree en route to the Ph.D.

Graduate degrees are awarded by the Graduate School of the University. The present document specifies in greater detail the regulations for our degrees in the Graduate Record (http://www.unc.edu/gradrecord/). The Record, the Graduate School Handbook (http://gradschool.unc.edu/handbook/), and other such documents from the Graduate School and the University remain the final authority on matters of University requirements and regulations.

The Director of Graduate Studies

Our graduate activities are coordinated and monitored by the Director of Graduate Study (DGS). Admissions and financial aid fall under the purview of the Department’s Graduate Admissions and Financial Aid Committee (the DGS and Associate Chair of the Academic Division serve as members), chaired by the DGS. The DGS works in concert with the Associate Chair of the Academic Division (when these two offices are not occupied by the same person), with the Director of Graduate Admissions, and with the Department’s Chair. The DGS also certifies to the Graduate School completion of various requirements leading to the award of a degree. Students wishing to waive any of the Department’s requirements or otherwise alter the programs outlined below must petition the DGS in writing.

Advising and Registration

Each semester the student will schedule an interview for advising with the DGS to agree upon courses for the following semester. Only after meeting with the student will the DGS remove the advisor’s flag in ConnectCarolina which will enable the student to register. The DGS’s evaluation of a student’s proposed scheme of study, and his or her performance, will play a crucial role in determining satisfactory progress as defined above and in certifying fulfillment of requirements for the degree. Graduate student progress, and their performance as assistants, are also reviewed on an annual basis by the faculty.

Statement of Shared Values

We—the graduate students and faculty of the UNC musicology program—always strive to provide a safe and collegial environment that nurtures intellectual growth and academic freedom.

We respect diverse views in seminars and other scholarly conversations by listening carefully, by consciously making space for others’ voices, and by taking each individual’s ideas seriously.

We value participation from people of all stances and identities—including, but not limited to, class, ethnicity, faith, gender, nationality, politics, and sexuality. In seeking to empower all participants in our conversations, we aim to be conscious of how wider systems of power and marginalization may shape our interactions and perceptions.

We acknowledge the competitiveness in academia, but we also foster an environment of supportiveness and collegiality in our academic endeavors.

The Honor Code

All graduate students in the program are strongly encouraged to read the Graduate School’s policies on Academic Integrity and Ethics (please visit http://gradschool.unc.edu/academics/resources/ethics.html). These policies, including the Honor Code, are applicable at all times. In the event of student misconduct that appears to violate these policies, the DGS will follow all protocols as mandated by the University as well as the Graduate School.

Research Fellowships and Grants

The Graduate Program and Graduate School offer graduate students a number of fellowships and grants to support research and professional development. The Graduate Program offers the following:

  • The Kenan Graduate Student Activities Fund supports graduate students’ academic activities broadly conceived to include conference presentation and attendance, research, professional development training, graduate student-faculty collaborative activities, and departmental-based graduate student programs to include the Pruett Summer Research Fellowships, Schoenberg Academy in Vienna, and the King’s College partnership.
  • The Pruett Summer Research Fellowships offer graduate students the opportunity to spend up to three summer months in the Music Division of the Library of Congress processing archival collections in the Division and conducting independent research.

For more information on these departmental resources please visit the graduate program’s website at http://music.unc.edu/graduate.

The Graduate School offers the following fellowships:

  • Dissertation Completion Fellowships support doctoral students in the final year of their dissertation. Each fellowship enables a student to focus full time on research and writing. This improves quality of the work and shortens the time to complete the degree.
  • Off-Campus Dissertation Research Fellowships support students conducting dissertation research away from the UNC-Chapel Hill campus for one and two consecutive semesters.
  • Summer Research Fellowships provide summer support to doctoral students so they may focus exclusively on their dissertation research. The fellowship is intended to enable students to complete their degree more quickly and supports students who normally do not have funding during the summer.

For more information on these Graduate School resources, please visit http://gradschool.unc.edu/funding/gradschool/fundingcal.html.

The M.A. Degree: An Overview

A completed M.A. (or equivalent) and a passing grade on the M.A./Ph.D. Written Examination are the two principal requirements to continue toward the Ph.D. Students will complete a minimum of 30 credit-hours of course work toward the M.A., normally over a period of two academic years. Most individual courses count as three credit-hours (involving three hours in the classroom per week). In the first three semesters of residency, nine credit-hours per semester are required to meet the Graduate School definition of full-time study. Though the M.A. thesis alone (MUSC 993 taken for 3 credit-hours) technically meets the full-time requirement in the fourth semester, students should continue to take seminars in addition to 993 that will count toward coursework requirements for the Ph.D.

Two courses are required of all M.A. candidates:

  1. Music 750 “Resources and Methods of Musicology” (taken in the fall semester of the first year);
  2. Music 993 “Master’s Thesis and Research” (normally taken in the spring semester of the second year, leading to the presentation of the M.A. thesis).

These two courses count toward the total of 30 credit-hours. The remaining credit-hours (24) will normally consist of pro-seminars and seminars in musicology (including music history, music theory, ethnomusicology, and other scholarly topics in music) at the 800- and 900-levels.

Students pursuing the M.A. degree may petition to substitute one Independent Study (MUSC 890) for no more than 3 credit-hours during their second full year in the program. Prior to enrollment in MUSC 890, they must submit a written proposal of at least one page (single spaced) to the DGS outlining the scope of the intended subject, the schedule of meetings with the proposed faculty supervisor, and the planned result (usually a paper). This proposal must contain the written endorsement of the proposed faculty supervisor.

Should a student wish to undertake study outside the Department (e.g., in another department at UNC-CH), it must involve graduate courses of substance in the arts, humanities, and sciences, as opposed to courses that teach specific skills (such as computer programming and foreign languages) or that offer generic surveys. Courses taken outside the Department must have an obvious relationship to a student’s program, and the student must submit a written rationale concerning such study for the approval of the DGS, who may require written support from the DGS of the external department in question. The same procedure applies to the substituting of graduate courses in Music or another subject at other institutions (e.g., Duke University), subject to the formal credit-transfer schemes in place at a given time. Students are not normally permitted to have pre-earned credits count towards the degree save by Department approval and under the special circumstances sanctioned by the Graduate School.

There are three additional requirements for the M.A. degree:

  1. examination in one modern foreign language;
  2. a theory-proficiency examination;
  3. a passing grade on the M.A./Ph.D. Written Examination.

Each of these is described more fully below. Where appropriate, sample examination-papers are made available in the Music Library.

The University allows a maximum of five years for the completion of the M.A. degree. A full-time student in the graduate. program, however, particularly when that student receives financial aid from the Department or University, should complete the degree within two academic years. A supported student who does not complete the requirements for the degree prior to the fifth semester of the program will normally not be regarded as making satisfactory progress therein.

The M.A. Language Requirement

The M.A. student must demonstrate reading proficiency in one language other than English judged suitable to the scheme of study by the written consent of the DGS. Students may demonstrate proficiency in one of three ways: (1) By achieving a grade B or better in a UNC-CH fourth-semester (204) language course; (2) By placing out of the fourth-semester language course through the placement examination given by the appropriate foreign-language department; (3) By passing the appropriate Foreign Language Proficiency Assessment offered through the Graduate School. Any instruction taken in the course of meeting this requirement will not count toward the credit-hours required for the M.A. or Ph.D. Students are strongly encouraged to meet this requirement as early as possible in their course of study. This requirement must be met prior to receiving the M.A.

The Theory Proficiency Examination

All M.A. students must pass the Department’s Theory-Proficiency Examination prior to gaining the degree. The theory proficiency exam will consist of the course material through Music 132 plus chromatic harmony, in the format of a course final exam. It will be administered at the beginning of each fall semester. Students who receive an A- or better on the exam will have satisfied the theory proficiency requirement. Students who receive a grade of B-, B, or B+ on the exam will be told what their weaknesses are and given suggestions for studying. They may re-take the exam the subsequent year. Students who receive less than a B- on the exam will be required to take Music 132 and complete the course with a grade of B- or better. If Music 132 is not offered during one particular academic year (either fall or spring semester), then students may substitute Music 232 for Music 132. None of these undergraduate-level courses may count as credit hours toward a graduate degree.

The following is intended to help students prepare for the exam. The content of the exam is reflected in the following chapters of undergraduate theory texts or the related chapters in other standard undergraduate theory texts:

  • Chapters 1-24, Steven G. Laitz, The Complete Musician:  An Integrated Approach to Tonal Theory, Analysis, and Listening, 3rd edition (Oxford University Press 2011)
  • Chapters 1-26, Jane Piper Clendenning and Elizabeth West Marvin, The Musician’s Guide to Theory and Analysis, 2nd edition (W.W. Norton 2010)

The M.A./Ph.D. Written Examination

The M.A./Ph.D. Written Examination tests students’ general knowledge of the field. The examination is composed by a three-person faculty committee appointed each year by the DGS and is evaluated by the graduate faculty as a whole. It is given once each year over two days early in the Spring semester and consists of four parts, each of which lasts three hours: (1) an essay on a specific piece or pieces of music announced approximately one week in advance; (2) essays in response to a range of questions covering various aspects of the field of music, including history, theory, and ethnomusicology; (3) brief commentaries on a variety of musical excerpts (by ear and on paper), and short answers to a variety of specific questions on the field of music; (4) further essays in response to a range of questions covering various aspects of the field of music, as above under (2).

The examination is graded on a Pass-Fail basis. Students who pass the examination fulfill the Graduate School’s requirement of a comprehensive examination for the M.A. degree and the Graduate School’s requirement of a Ph.D. written examination; they are eligible to continue work toward the Ph.D. (see below). Students who fail the examination and wish to change their degree intent from the Ph.D. to exit with the M.A. will have their examinations re-evaluated in a second round against the necessarily lower standard of a comprehensive written examination for the M.A. degree only. A student may petition the DGS to re-take the examination once but may not take the examination a third time without reinstatement to the Graduate School.

Any graduate student for whom English is not the first language may petition the Ph.D. Written Exam committee for extended time on the Ph.D. Written Exam. The Committee will take the request to the Academic Faculty; if approved by the Academic Faculty, the petitioning student will have 1/3 as long in additional time on the exam (e.g., a 3-hour segment of the exam will be allotted a total of 4 hours).

Note: Students who entered the graduate program before August 2015 and who do not wish to complete the Ph.D. have the option to take the M.A. Oral Examination in lieu of the M.A./Ph.D. Written Examination. The M.A. Oral Examination must be completed by the end of the fourth semester for the student to maintain satisfactory progress toward the degree. The examination is administered by a committee of three, usually chaired by the student’s M.A. thesis advisor. The student will prepare a brief descriptive paragraph of each course applied for credit toward the M.A. degree (including any transferred courses) and distribute this to the members of the committee prior to the examination. The committee will question the student on the basis of these course descriptions. University regulations stipulate that a student who fails this examination may not take it again until at least three months have elapsed, and that a student may not take the examination a third time without reinstatement to the Graduate School.

The M.A. Thesis

The Department requires a thesis for the M.A. degree. Students will register for 3 credit- hours of MUSC 993 (Master’s Thesis and Research) no later than their fourth semester of residence, during which they will write their theses. The thesis will be a revision of a paper prepared for a graduate seminar in musicology. It will represent a genuinely original scholarly effort, if (by its nature) on a relatively small scale. The M.A. thesis should not disrupt progress toward Ph.D.-level work, although students often regard it as an opportunity to complete a substantial piece of scholarship that can serve as a basis for their first publication (whether within or outside the intended area of the Ph.D. dissertation). By the Spring semester of the first year the student should be alert to the need to select such a paper and also to identify a faculty thesis advisor. The thesis committee will consist of this advisor and two other members of the faculty, all three to be appointed by the DGS. There is no oral defense of the M.A. thesis; the thesis is approved when judged to be satisfactory in its written form by the committee.

In order to maintain satisfactory progress, students must present a complete draft of the thesis for committee approval by the end of the fourth semester.

The Ph.D. Degree: An Overview

A completed M.A. (or equivalent) and a passing grade on the M.A./Ph.D. Written Examination are the two principal requirements to continue toward the Ph.D.

Students accepted into the program who have already earned a graduate degree from a different institution will consult with the Director of Graduate Studies to determine whether or not that degree will be recognized in whole or in part, based on the requirements of that degree and their congruence with those of our own program, including but not limited to such factors as the nature of the coursework (seminar-based, as opposed to lectures or surveys), the number of credit hours, the requirement of a substantial master’s thesis, and the presence within the institution of a comparable Ph.D. program. A student who has met all these requirements may petition the DGS to waive the requirement of completing our M.A. degree en route to the Ph.D. A student whose degree is not recognized in full may receive some transfer credit for individual courses in accordance with the guidelines of the Graduate School.

Students normally take the M.A./Ph.D. Written Examination in their fourth semester of residence. Students who have received a waiver for the M.A. must take the examination in their second semester of residence. The format and grading of the examination is described above, under “The M.A. Degree: An Overview.”

Students who have received a waiver for the M.A. will take MUSC 750 to supplement their prior experience and acquaint them with the UNC program and faculty. They will also be expected in the course of their first year to meet the Department’s M.A. language requirement and to pass the Department’s theory-proficiency examination (described above); students may petition the DGS to have prior graduate-level language proficiency demonstrated at another institution count toward the M.A. language requirement. Students may (but need not) take a maximum of one Independent Study (MUSC 890) in their first year; the procedure to register for MUSC 890 will follow that detailed above under the M.A. Degree.

The Ph.D. principally combines coursework with independent scholarly research that culminates in the writing of a dissertation. The Ph.D. student must take at least 12 credit-hours of pro-seminars and seminars in musicology (including music history, music theory, ethnomusicology, and other scholarly topics in music) at the 800- or 900-level beyond the 30 credit-hours for the M.A. Students may take no more than two Independent Studies (MUSC 890) in a given academic year; the procedure to register for MUSC 890 will follow that detailed above under M.A. degree. Students may also elect to pursue a formal minor as specified by the regulations of the Graduate School. Any courses taken outside the Department (whether or not in fulfillment of a minor) must be courses of substance as detailed above under the discussion of extra-Departmental courses for the M.A. Any pro-seminars or seminars taken beyond the 30-credit minimum during the time of M.A. candidacy count toward the Ph.D. requirement.

In addition to seminars, the Ph.D. student must take:

  1. at least six credit-hours of MUSC 994 (Doctoral Dissertation);
  2. at least  three credit-hours of MUSC 994’s co-requisite, MUSC 991 (Dissertation Colloquium).

Students must register for at least three credit-hours of MUSC 994 during any semester in which they make progress on their research or complete a formal academic milestone (e.g., a defense of the dissertation proposal or of the dissertation itself).

Students are expected to register for MUSC 991 (“Dissertation Colloquium”) for each semester in which they also register for MUSC 994, save for the following exceptions: 1) when prevented from doing so by absence from campus with the written consent of the DGS and 2) in the semester in which the student defends the dissertation. MUSC 991 (1.5 credit hours) does not increase the tuition-fee obligations for which students or the Department are responsible.

The purpose of the “Dissertation Colloquium” is to provide advanced graduate students a forum where they can present and discuss work-in-progress on their dissertations, conference papers, articles, and other writing projects. Course content will also include professional-development activities such as practicing conference presentations as well as reviewing research fellowship applications and job application materials.

Registration for MUSC 994 constitutes full-time enrollment under Graduate School definitions (although a two-year residency requirement must still be met by students entering with an appropriate Master’s degree in hand). University regulations allow the student eight years from the date of first enrollment to complete all requirements for the Ph.D. degree. However, the Department and Graduate School strongly encourage students to make more expeditious progress toward their Ph.D.

The Ph.D. Language Requirement

The Ph.D. student must demonstrate reading proficiency in two languages other than English chosen from languages judged suitable to the scheme of study by the written consent of the DGS (the first will normally have been successfully examined already as part of the M.A. degree). The Ph.D. language requirement can be met in the same ways, and under the same conditions, as the M.A, language requirement (see above), or in the case of a language not supported by such means, by way of an appropriate test arranged separately. The second language requirement must be met by the end of the semester in which the First Ph.D. Oral Examination is held. Please see Advancement to Candidacy (below) for information regarding qualifying for PhD Candidate status and eligibility to apply for Graduate School and external research fellowships.

The First Ph.D. Oral Examination (Dissertation Proposal Defense)

Upon completing the requirements for the M.A. degree, the student will begin to work on a dissertation topic with a specific faculty member. Students identify a dissertation topic and, in consultation with the DGS, a suitable dissertation advisor, who is appointed by the DGS. Once their required seminar coursework is completed, students register for Doctoral Dissertation (MUSC 994) with their dissertation advisor and undertake the necessary readings, preliminary research, and field summary to prepare their dissertation proposal. Students will normally begin exploring possible topics during their fourth semester and do the bulk of this work during their fifth semester, culminating in a critical evaluation of the scholarly literature associated with it by the end of the fifth semester from entry into the M.A. program (third semester for students who have received a waiver for the M.A.).. This work prepares the student to write a dissertation proposal.

As soon as possible after completion of the requirements for the M.A. degree, the student will convene a dissertation committee, comprising the dissertation advisor (who will normally serve as chair) and four other faculty members. Some of these may come from outside the Department as deemed appropriate by the regulations of the Graduate School and the DGS, who must appoint the entire committee. At least three people on the committee, including the chair, must be regular members of the UNC-CH faculty. Faculty on fixed-term appointment or from other institutions require formal approval by the Graduate School in a process initiated by the DGS.

The dissertation committee will submit the student to an oral examination and formal review of the dissertation proposal. All committee members must participate in the First Ph.D. Oral Examination save in the most extenuating circumstances, and in any case, the examination must be conducted with five faculty members present.

The proposal itself consists of a document in three parts:

  1. an abstract of the proposed dissertation suitable for posting on the Department website and for submission to the online database Doctoral Dissertations in Musicology (sponsored by the American Musicological Society);
  2. a comprehensive statement that summarizes both the substance of the proposed dissertation and the steps that will be taken to complete it;
  3. an extensive bibliography including, when required by the subject, a detailed list of sources.

The student will present copies of the proposal to the members of the committee before the examination. At the examination the committee will question the student concerning the appropriateness and feasibility of the dissertation as outlined in the proposal. Immediately after the examination, the committee will recommend either the acceptance of the proposal, its rejection, or its modification. A rejection amounts to failure of the examination and is subject to the same procedures as a failure of the M.A./Ph.D. Written Examination. Should the proposal require modification, the committee may or may not delegate responsibility for monitoring such modification to the committee chair; in this case, however, another examination will not normally be required.

Advancement to Candidacy

Immediately upon passing the First Ph.D. Oral Examination, students who have completed all Departmental language and theory requirements, and have met all appropriate Graduate School conditions, will qualify for Advancement to Ph.D. Candidacy. In common parlance, a “Ph.D. Candidate” is classified as ABD (“All But Dissertation”). The Department requires Advancement to Candidacy for nomination for Graduate School Fellowships (Research or Dissertation Completion Fellowships) or for Society of Fellows awards. Students must also be Ph.D. Candidates to qualify for certain external sources of dissertation awards such as AMS 50 Fellowships and the like.

The Dissertation

The dissertation is the central activity of the Ph.D. degree. In the course of researching and writing it the student begins to gain the status of independent scholar. The dissertation is a substantial contribution to the fund of knowledge in the discipline; it will be judged as a publication by the external scholarly community. The student should not, however, confuse heft with significance, and while a particular topic might require an especially lengthy treatment, another equally valid dissertation might take a considerably more compressed form.

A student will confer frequently with the advisor (normally once a week), who will read the dissertation chapter by chapter, making appropriate comment and corrections.  The student is also encouraged (in consultation with the advisor) to invite other committee members to read and comment on revised drafts of chapters. All committee members will have read the entire dissertation thoroughly before the time of the defense. For this reason, the student must submit the complete dissertation draft to be defended at least four weeks in advance of its defense to all members of his or her committee in order for them to propose any substantial revisions they consider necessary.

The Second Ph.D. Oral Examination (Dissertation Defense)

When the advisor deems the dissertation acceptable in substantial terms, he or she will have the candidate 1) submit it to the committee for evaluation and 2) poll the committee for available dates to sit the dissertation defense. The committee must receive the dissertation at least four weeks in advance of the scheduled date for the defense. The committee chair will then convene the Second Ph.D. Oral Examination, in which the doctoral candidate defends the dissertation. All committee members must be present at the Second Ph.D. Oral Examination save in extraordinary circumstances, and in any case, the examination must be conducted with five faculty members present. The committee may, if this seems appropriate, open the defense to the public. The candidate will be expected not only to answer questions of detail at the defense, but also to expand upon the larger aspects of the dissertation in terms of its subject, methodologies, and relationship to other work in the same field. Immediately after the examination, the committee will recommend either acceptance of the dissertation or its rejection. Acceptance may also involve minor corrections to the dissertation by the candidate to the satisfaction of the committee members. When these requirements have been fulfilled, the Report of the Final Oral Examination is submitted (signatures of all committee members are required) to the Graduate School, as well as the dissertation in a form designed to meet the standards defined in the Graduate School’s Guide to Theses and Dissertations.

Appendix I: Financial Aid

There can be no absolute rules governing the awarding of such aid to graduate students because of the uncertainties of state funding as well as other variables. Nevertheless, it is possible to define a number of general principles that guide the faculty each year in assigning aid.

Financial Aid is normally granted by way of Departmental teaching and research assistantships, and University fellowships. The Department Chair awards assistantships and ranks students for University fellowships based on the recommendation of the Graduate Admissions and Financial Aid Committee.

Subject to legislative appropriation, Financial Aid normally comprises a stipend, the payment of in-state tuition, tuition remissions for out-of-state students, and other benefits. In order to maximize the available resources, the Graduate School and department strongly encourage out-of-state students who are U.S. citizens to apply for in-state residency no later than the beginning of their third semester (incoming state residents should apply before matriculation). Steps should be undertaken immediately upon arrival in North Carolina to establish in-state residency.

For more information about the procedure and access to the online residency application, students should review the information at: http://gradschool.unc.edu/residency/index.html.

By means of teaching assistantship, research assistantship, University fellowship or a combination of these, the department typically supports a beginning M.A.-Ph.D. candidate through the fourth year (through the third year if the student enters the program with an M.A.).  However, students who receive external awards or other funding during the tenure of their departmental fellowships or assistantships such that internal support is not required will normally be permitted to defer up to two separate or consecutive semesters of the fellowship or assistantship to the next available year (i.e., the fifth year in the case of a fellowship or assistantship initially awarded for four years). In addition the department has generally been able to support  students in good standing beyond the fourth year (for example, when defined funds are available to perform some specific departmental service or when teaching assignments are offered through Carolina Courses Online and Part-time Classroom Studies). Students working on their dissertations are encouraged to apply for extra-Departmental funding, such as University dissertation research and writing fellowships and external fellowships such as AMS-50 Fellowships. Students are encouraged to consult with the DGS and dissertation advisors for information about available fellowships.

Holders of Departmental teaching and research assistantships will be expected to carry out duties associated with such assistantships. Usually these duties involve acting as a teaching assistant (TA) on at least one undergraduate course per semester, ranging from grading assignments through running recitations (small-group tutorials) to teaching the occasional class. The Department views the experience gained by its TAs to be an important part of a student’s professional development, and makes every effort to ensure that TAs have an opportunity to be involved in a range of courses with different faculty members.

Assistantships and fellowships are awarded subject to annual review, and may be withdrawn if a student fails to remain in good standing or to make satisfactory progress. Departmental teaching and research assistantships may also be withdrawn if a student fails to fulfill adequately the duties associated with those assistantships. The process of awarding (and withdrawing) assistantships lies in the hands of the Department Chair, advised by the Associate Chair (Academic Division) and by the DGS in conjunction with the Graduate Admissions and Financial Aid Committee.

Admission to the program and the awarding of financial aid are two separate processes, and students admitted without financial aid remain eligible to enter the program and progress through it. Such students may submit a written petition to the DGS for financial aid in their second or subsequent years as part of their yearly self-assessment; the DGS will bring such petitions to the attention of the faculty and the Department’s Graduate Admissions and Financial Aid Committee. While the Department is sensitive to the needs of its unfunded students, they compete in the pool with new admissions in each subsequent year.

Appendix II: Summary of Requirements and Deadlines

  • Theory-Proficiency Examination (should be passed by end of first year of residency; must be passed before completion of the M.A. degree)
  • Instate Residency: Application for In-State Residency strongly encouraged by the beginning of the third semester (incoming state residents should apply before matriculation). Students should be aware of the requirements for establishing in-state residency and begin to fulfill them as soon as they arrive in Chapel Hill.
  • M.A. Language Requirement (must be met before completion of the M.A. degree)
  • Master’s Thesis (complete draft must be submitted by end of fourth semester)
  • M.A./Ph.D. Written Examination (normally taken early in the fourth semester [second semester for students entering with approved M.A. or equivalent])
  • Ph.D. Language Requirement (must be met before the First Ph.D. Oral Examination)
  • First Ph.D. Oral Examination (i.e., defense of dissertation proposal; normally taken during the first or second semester following the M.A./Ph.D. Written Examination)
  • Dissertation and Second Ph.D. Oral Examination (must be completed within eight calendar years from the date of first registration in the graduate program).

Appendix III: Graduation Policy

The Graduate Program in Musicology’s guidelines for student graduation and ceremony participation follow those published in the Graduate School Handbook. (http://handbook.unc.edu/)

Students must notify The Graduate School of their plan to graduate by submitting an Application for Graduation no later than the deadline shown in the University Registrar’s Calendar for the semester in which they expect to graduate. Applications should only be submitted when the student realistically intends to graduate that semester and are valid for one semester only. If a student does not graduate in the semester expected, s/he must submit another application for graduation in a future semester.

Master’s and doctoral degrees are awarded at the end of each semester (May and December) and the second summer session (August). Formal commencement exercises, hosted by the Graduate School, are held in May and December, whereas the Department of Music’s graduation ceremony is held in May only.

All students receiving their degrees in May are encouraged to participate in the department’s May commencement ceremony. All students receiving their degrees in August and December are encouraged to participate in the department’s May commencement the following year.

Doctoral students are also encouraged to participate in the Graduate School’s Hooding Ceremony, held in May only, recognizing those who are graduating in May or those who graduated in the prior most recent December or August terms. Students planning to participate in the hooding ceremony should contact The Graduate School.

Only students who have successfully submitted their thesis or dissertation to the Graduate School by its April deadline may participate in the department’s commencement ceremony in May. Those who submit their thesis or dissertation for an August or December graduation must wait to participate in the department’s commencement ceremony the following year.

Appendix IV: Policy for Conferring the Glen Haydon Award for an Outstanding Dissertation in Musicology

I. Upon successful completion of the Second Ph.D. Oral Examination, and after a dissertation has been submitted to and accepted by the Graduate School, the dissertation advisor may nominate the dissertation for a Haydon Award by way of a letter to the DGS:

The letter shall specify in detail the features of the dissertation (both its form and content) that would lead the faculty to designate it an outstanding example of research and writing in the field of musicology (broadly construed), and how the dissertation makes a highly original and significantly insightful contribution to scholarship in music.

All members of the Dissertation Committee shall review this letter and subscribe to its contents with their signatures.

II. The DGS will forward this letter to the entire academic faculty for its consideration.

III. The assembled academic faculty will discuss the nomination at one of its meetings with the dissertation chair present, asking any relevant questions and listening to the presentations of the dissertation committee (a copy of the dissertation will be made available for the inspection of any faculty member who wishes it). After discussion and consideration of the nomination, the academic faculty will vote on whether to recommend conferral of the Haydon Award to the department chair. The chair will award a prize based on this vote.

IV. The Haydon Award is not competitive save by the criterion of a dissertation being “outstanding,” and there is no limit on the number of awards that may be granted in a given period. The Haydon Award, however, will be conferred only in exceptional cases.

Revised April 15, 2015