Ph.D. Candidate

Gina Bombola hails from sunny California. In 2008, she graduated from Vanderbilt University with a double major in Musical Arts and European Studies. Gina then returned to the West Coast to obtain an M.M. in Harp Performance from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Currently, she is working on a dissertation titled “Can’t Help Singing: The Modern ‘Opera’ Diva in Hollywood Film, 1930-1950,” which explores issues of gender, ethnicity, class, and music appreciation in classic Hollywood films. Other research interests include: Josephine Baker in 1930s French film and Aaron Copland’s film scores.

  • Email: bombola@live.unc.edu
  • Office: 219 Hill Hall

“The Trouble with Leitmotifs: Aaron Copland and The Heiress (1949),” M.A. thesis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2013.

Conference Papers

“What’s in a name? From There’s Magic in Music to The Hard-Boiled Canary: Music Appreciation and Marketing in the Movies,” The Society for American Music, Boston, MA, March 2016

“‘Today’s songbird must have optical appeal’: Hollywood Constructs the Prima Donna Ideal,” Feminism Here and Now: An Interdisciplinary Conversation, Chapel Hill, NC, November 2015

“Scandalous Sight, Sublime Sound: Opera and Film Censorship in I Dream Too Much (1935),” The Capital and Southeast Chapters of the American Musicological Society Joint Conference, Richmond, VA, October 2015

“‘Heavyweight Diva is Passé’ : Hollywood’s Influence on Opera’s Prima Donna,” The 22nd International Conference of Europeanists, Paris, France, July 2015

“Scandalous Sight, Sublime Sound: Opera and Film Censorship in I Dream Too Much (1935),” University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill ̶ King’s College London Graduate Student Conference, London, United Kingdom, May 2015

 “‘Art is Art—but Heft is Heft’ : How Hollywood Fashioned the Modern Opera Diva in One Night of Love (1934),” The Society for American Music, Sacramento, CA, March 2015

“Avoid Leitmotifs in the Films—Unless It Happens to be a Psychological Melodrama: Aaron Copland and The Heiress (1949),” The Aaron Copland Symposium at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, August 2014

“Slim Silhouettes: Women’s Operatic Voices and Curve Consciousness in One Night of Love (1934),” University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill ̶ King’s College London Graduate Student Conference, Chapel Hill, June 2014

“‘Me, the Machine’: Imogen Heap, Cyborgs, and Magical, Musical Gloves,” South Central Graduate Music Consortium, September 2013

“‘She’s No Longer a Curiosity:’ How Music and Visual Image Signify the ‘Transformation’ of Josephine Baker in Princesse Tam-Tam,” UNC-Kings College London Conference, May 2013

Alvin H. Johnson AMS 50 Dissertation Fellowship (2016-2017)

Off-Campus Dissertation Research Fellowship, The Graduate School, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-Chapel Hill, Spring 2015)

James and Sylvia Thayer Short-Term Fellowship at the University of California at Los Angeles Library (UCLA, Summer 2014)

Summer Research Fellowship, Graduate School, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-Chapel Hill, Summer 2014)

James W. Pruett Summer Research Fellowship in Music at the Library of Congress (Summer 2012)

Instructor of Record

  • MUSC 144: Introduction to Country Music (Summer 2016)
  • WMST/MUSC 188: Introduction to Women and Music (Fall 2015)
  • MUSC 144: Introduction to Country Music (Summer 2013)

Instructor of Record for Carolina Courses Online

  • MUSC 143.900: Introduction to Rock (Spring 2016)
  • MUSC 143.900: Introduction to Rock (Summer 2015)

Co-Instructor of Record

  • MUSC/PWAD 289: The Sounds of War and Revolution Since 1750 (Spring 2014)
  • MUSC 390H: Honors Seminar on Music and Politics (Spring 2014)

Recitation Leader

  • MUSC 146: Introduction to World Musics (Spring 2013)
  • MUSC 142: Great Musical Works (Fall 2011)